Foot Drop Risk Factors

By Mayo Clinic Staff The peroneal nerve controls the muscles that lift your foot. This nerve runs near the surface of your skin on the side of your knee closest to your hand. Activities that compress this nerve can increase your risk of foot drop. Examples include: Crossing your legs. People who habitually cross their
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Foot Drop

Foot drop, sometimes called “drop foot,” is the inability to lift the front part of the foot. This causes the toes to drag along the ground while walking. To avoid dragging the toes, people with foot drop may lift their knee higher than normal. Or they may swing their leg in a wide arc. Foot
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Drop Foot: Causes, Treatments, And More

http://Multiple sclerosis (MS) http://Other causes http://Treatment http://Outlook Overview Key points People with drop foot tend to walk by lifting the knee as though they were walking up stairs. Drop foot is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), but it can also affect people with Lou Gehrig’s disease or muscular dystrophy. Treatment options include orthotics,
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What can I do myself?

The danger of foot drop is that it can increase your risk of tripping as the tow catches on the floor. It can be sensible to take precautions at home to reduce the risk of falls and injury: Keep all floors clear of clutter. Avoid loose rugs, electrical cords and other trip hazards Make sure
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How is foot drop treated?

If the underlying cause can be treated, foot drop may improve or disappear. If the underlying cause can’t be treated, foot drop may be permanent. In addition to treatment of the underlying problem, specific treatment may include: Braces or splints. These help hold the foot in a normal position. Ankle-foot orthoses. These are specialised L-shaped ankle
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How is foot drop investigated?

Foot drop is a symptom rather than a diagnosis and your doctor will want to understand what has caused it. Investigation for the cause of foot drop may include: X-rays. Plain X-rays may be used to look for a soft tissue growth or a bone abnormality that may be causing your symptoms. Ultrasound. This may
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How is foot drop diagnosed?

Foot drop is usually diagnosed on examination. Your doctor will watch you walk and may check your leg muscles for weakness. They will also assess nerve function by checking your reflexes and the sensation in the skin.     http://patient.info/health/foot-drop
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How does foot drop differ from normal walking?

The ‘cycle’ of action in normal walking is as follows: The foot moves forwards (swing phase). The foot touches the ground. This is usually first with the heel (initial contact, sometimes called heel strike or foot strike) and then forwards on to the ball of the foot. The foot pushes off and leaves the ground
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What does the common peroneal nerve do and how can it be injured?

The peroneal nerve controls the muscles that lift your foot. This nerve is quite exposed to trauma where it runs just under the skin on the outer side of the knee. Activities that compress this nerve can increase your risk of foot drop. Examples include: Crossing the legs. People who habitually cross their legs can
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